Learn About Australian Labradoodles

Australian Labradoodles are one of the most misunderstood breeds.  This page should help clear things up.

Breed History

The Australian Labradoodle breed dates back to the 1980’s and was initiated by Wally Conran of Royal Guide Dogs located in Victoria Australia. The intent was to create a breed that was allergy and asthma friendly with the temperament of a service dog. This journey was inspired by a visually impaired woman in Hawaii who needed a Guide Dog which wouldn’t aggravate her husband’s allergies. Of the 31 Labradoodles bred at Royal Guide Dogs, an amazing 29 made it through as Guide Dogs… a true testament to this “new breed’ of Guide Dog.

 

To continue the efforts of Wally Conron, breeders in Australia began breeding Labradoodles determined to produce litters with consistent conformation, coat type, and temperament. During the 90’s, a number of other dog breeds were bred into the Labradoodle lines to assist in this effort. Most often, the English Cocker Spaniel and American Cocker Spaniel were the breeds used; however, it is reported that a few other dog breeds were also introduced into certain lines. DNA evidence of these dog breeds is still found in a few lines today, while others were bred out and not reintroduced into any other bloodlines.

 

Currently, the Australian Labradoodle is considered to be a cross between the Poodle, Cocker Spaniel and Labrador Retriever, while the Labradoodle is a cross between the Labrador Retriever and Poodle only.

 

Organizations have been formed to protect the continued development of the Australian Labradoodle lines, and guidelines for the continued introduction of English and American Cocker Spaniel are followed carefully. Infusion committees also discuss the merits of other possible dog breeds being allowed careful introduction into select lines. It is an exciting time to be involved in the development of this breed.

Multigenerational, F1, F2, what does it all mean:

If you take a Labrador and cross it with a Poodle, the resulting puppies are usually referred to as first generation (or F1) Labradoodles. Take that first generation (F1) Labradoodle and cross it with another first generation (F1) [or higher] Labradoodle, and the resulting puppies will be second generation (F2) Labradoodles. Take a second generation (F2) Labradoodle and cross it with another second generation (F2) [or higher] Labradoodle and the resulting puppies will be third generation (F3) Labradoodles. It's important to note that there are common terms used to refer to these Labradoodles such as Early Generation Labradoodle, American Labradoodle, etc. All of these terms can be used interchangeably but refer to the same thing - a Labrador bred with a Poodle. We will simply refer to them as Labradoodles.

 

We can categorize Australian Labradoodles by generation the same way we do with other Labradoodles, but as opposed to the F1, F2, F3… terminology, we use ALF1, ALF2, ALF3… where ALF stands for ‘Australian Labradoodle Foundation’. However, since most Australian Labradoodles are now a very high generation (they’ve been bred for over 35 years), we usually just refer to them as multi-generation Australian Labradoodles.

Benefits of an Australian Labradoodle compared to a Labradoodle:

Consistency:

Regular Labradoodles are low generation versus the multigenerational Australian Labradoodles. This means that Labradoodles have very little consistency in the litters of puppies produced. When you cross a Labrador with a Poodle, the resulting puppies can vary significantly in size, coat type (shedding or not shedding) and temperament. When you get to the second and third generations, things get even more complicated as the genetics play out and throw-backs start appearing. This means a second or third generation Labradoodle could look like a poorly bred Labrador or a poorly bred Poodle rather than a Labradoodle. There is predictable consistency in Australian Labradoodle litters. This is primarily because we are now so far down the generations (over 35 years of breeding), and as we breed further, physical characteristics and attributes become even more predictable and consistent. Every puppy in an Australian Labradoodle litter will be recognisable as an Australian Labradoodle and throw-backs to parent breeds are very rare.

 

Being only a few generations away from a Labrador, it is no surprise that the vast majority of Early Generation Labradoodles DO SHED their coats and are therefore NOT suitable for allergy sufferers. Unfortunately, this is a common misconception. Australian Labradoodles on the other hand, are many more generations away from the shedding Labrador; their coats have been developed over the last 35 years such that they DO NOT SHED and therefore have a very high compatibility rate with allergy and asthma sufferers.

Coat - Shedding & Allergies:

Being only a few generations away from a Labrador, it is no surprise that the vast majority of Early Generation Labradoodles DO SHED their coats and are therefore NOT suitable for allergy sufferers. Unfortunately, this is a common misconception. Australian Labradoodles on the other hand, are many more generations away from the shedding Labrador; their coats have been developed over the last 35 years such that they DO NOT SHED and therefore have a very high compatibility rate with allergy and asthma sufferers.​

Temperament:

Labradoodles with low generations tend to be lively and potentially on the hyperactive side, particularly when compared to the calmer, better-balanced Australian Labradoodles. Australian Labradoodles have an innate desire to please and are highly intelligent which makes them easy to train. This has made them very popular choices for the service dog industry. The breed is known to be great with young children which makes them an ideal choice for a family. They are still energetic and love to be outdoors for those with active lifestyles, but are very easy to settle down and relax.

Australian Labradoodle FAQ:

How are Australian Labradoodles different than regular Labradoodles or Golden Doodles?

Australian Labradoodles are non-shedding and have a temperament that is ideal for training. This is why they have become very popular as service dogs. They are purebred dogs which produce consistent breed characteristics unlike regular Labradoodles and Golden Doodles that produce inconsistent breeding results and often have shedding coats and can exhibit a high variance in temperament.

How big are Australian Labradoodles?

  • Miniature : Weight: 20 to 30lbs

  • Medium: Weight: 30 to 45 lbs

  • Standard: Height: Weight: 45 + lbs

Do Australian Labardoodls have different color coats?

Yes, Australian Labradoodles can exibit solid color and spotted coats can range in color including chocolate, black, white/chalk, cream, silver, carmel, gold among others.

Are Australian Labradoodles hypoallergenic?

The Australian Labradoodle breed is typically non-shedding which can help greatly with those who suffer from dog allergies. The degree to which you are allergic can play a big part in how you will react and many that are allergic to dogs are also allergic to a dog's saliva. If you are allergic to dogs and are considering this breed, we recommend that you spend time with the dog prior to adoption to help determine how you will react. Our son was very allergic to our Labrador Retriever but is not at all allergic to our Australian Labradoodles. Your results may be different, so it's important to do your homework first.

What  dog food do you recommend?

We recommend natural dog food that is beef or lamb based. We do NOT recommend chicken based dog food or treats. Australian Labradoodles can be allergic to chicken so we recommend if you choose to feed chicken base foods that you observe your dog closely for symptoms such as itching, licking and scooting. We use and recommend Taste of the Wild - High Sierra lamb based food.

Paw small.png

About Australian Labradoodles